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February 25, 2012

Securities Investing: Keep it Simple

I’ve recently been looking at my stock portfolio.  I’m going to be back to work soon and I want to get a jump on what I want to buy when my full income kicks back in.  I’ve also been paying attention to the personal finance blogosphere again.  Nothing much has changed.  People who are talking about stock investing are really just talking about gambling or they’re talking gibberish.  So I thought I’d share a few details about my portfolio.

I started my portfolio around April 2010.  I spread $5,000 over six different stocks and have been making regular buys up until my layoff last December.  As of yesterday (Feb 24, 2012) I am approximately 13.5% up with an approximate 7.4% annualized rate of return on 10 individual stocks.  In an insanely volatile year for the market, I still managed to make a few bucks.  How did I do it?

I kept it simple.  I don’t get into options trading.  I don’t do forex trading.  I don’t do arbitrage.  I don’t do derivatives.  I don’t day trade.  I don’t speculate.  I don’t do any of the things that are really just gambling on the market.  I keep my risks low by being a strict value investor.

As a value investor, I follow the axiom of “Buy great companies at attractive prices.”  Of course, the trick is figuring out what a great company is and then what an attractive price is.

Figuring out the greatness of a company generally has a qualitative and quantitative component.  The quantitative component is the answer to the question, “Does the company make money consistently?”  The qualitative component is whether the company has an enduring competitive advantage.  When both of these components are affirmative, you’ve found a great company.

That leaves the question of what an attractive price is.  First, you need to find the intrinsic value of the company.  Once you’ve figured that out, you can figure out what discount you are comfortable with.  I generally require at least a 30% discount against intrinsic value.

In my opinion, this is the minimum amount of research you need to do when selecting individual securities.  If you aren’t willing to do this, you should just stick to index funds.

If you are willing to do that kind of research, take a look at the books listed in the Amazon affiliate box to your right.  Those are the foundational books I built my investment strategies around.

Thanks for reading.

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